Potbelly Sandwich Shop in O’Fallon (MO)

The St. Louis area now has its third Potbelly Sandwich Shop. The newest Potbelly is open in O’Fallon, MO, at 2025 Highway K. (That’s 1.6 miles south of I-70.)

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The shop features “toasty” warm sandwiches, salads, soups, chili, and shakes and smoothies. And a friendly crew!

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Crew 1

I sampled the Potbelly sandwich called “A Wreck” which comes with salami, roast beef, turkey, ham and Swiss cheese. Take a look…

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I got mine with lettuce, tomato, pickle and mayo. There’s a lot of good stuff on that sandwich. Very filling! (Took the other half back to share with a co-worker who loved it.)

The Sriracha Black Bean Soup was just spicy enough to enhance its deliciousness. I want more!

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If you’re a milk shake fan, try the coffee flavored shake. Or maybe get chocolate and coffee mixed for a mocha shake.

Potbelly shake

And would you believe that a sandwich shop has live entertainment? Yep. Everyday between 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., there are live music performers! Nice touch.

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The manager at the O’Fallon Potbelly is Mike Wright. Owners are Todd and Angie Stimson. They also have Potbelly Sandwich shops in Creve Coeur (on Olive in the old Provisions location) and in Clayton (on Bemiston in the old Fatted Calf location). Their next Potbelly is set to open in late summer in St. Charles near Lindenwood University.

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By the way, the name comes from the potbelly stove that was in the original Potbelly Sandwich Shop in Chicago. It was an antique store that began serving lunch to their shoppers and, before long, they were better known for their food than for their antiques.

Potbelly Sandwich Shop in O’Fallon is open at 11:00 a.m. each day. It closes at 9:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday and at 8:00 p.m. on Sundays. For more information, click HERE.

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We Make Beer

We Make Beer

The craft beer movement keeps growing and new stories emerge daily about brewers and their beers. Sean Lewis relates several of those stories in his new book We Make Beer. Lewis brings a reporter’s perspective and also shares personal viewpoints. This is Lewis’ first book but he has written for Beer Advocate magazine and is a skilled writer.

The craft brewers Lewis visits and writes about range from small operations just starting out to the two biggest craft brewers, Sam Adams and Sierra Nevada. He finds that some are rather casual about their brewing while others exercise strict control of their beer making. Is it okay if particular brew varies in taste from batch to batch? Depends.

Because Lewis lived in Massachusetts when he began the book and in California when he finished it, those two states’ brewers get the bulk of his attention. But he also writes about breweries in Birmingham, Nashville, Austin, Lancaster/Ephrata (Pennsylvania) and Papillion (Nebraska). The craft beer scene in Portland, anchored by Deschutes, gets its due, too.

Sean Lewis author photo_ Credit Victoria Knowles

(Sean Lewis photo by Victoria Knowles.)

Lewis offers inside looks at the brewing process and the brewery business. There’s enough detail about what goes in and what comes out of a brewing tank to satisfy most serious beer geeks. Those of us who may not care so much for the technical stuff can enjoy meeting the individuals who make beer and learning about their motivations and passions.

He spends a few pages of the book addressing the 2011 sale of Chicago’s successful craft brewer Goose Island to AB/InBev. The sale “felt like a betrayal because Anheuser-Busch had long served as the face of the enemy,” he writes.

(I’ve spoken to Goose Island and A-B folks who defend the purchase, saying the main differences are stricter safety standards, better consistency in product and wider distribution. A-B also has the power to aid in sourcing raw materials plus capacity to handle demand in other locations that can’t be met in Chicago, they say.)

Lewis mentions in a footnote that naming a favorite beer is “an impossible question to answer.” But, he writes, “If I had to choose one beer to drink for the rest of my life, it would be Firestone Walker’s Pale 31.” I’ll be checking this weekend to find out if anybody in St. Louis has it!

Click HERE to purchase We Make Beer from Amazon.